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A Yellowknife Woman's Torturous Bathroom Trip, and Ensuing Legal Battle

A Yellowknife woman with multiple sclerosis suffered a "humiliating experience" and was discriminated against by the N.W.T. legislative assembly when she raised concerns about the building's lack of automatic door openers, only to become trapped in a bathroom two years later partlybecause anopenerstill hadn't been installed.That was the decision Thursdayof Adrian Wright, theadjudicator rulingon a human rights complaint Elizabeth Portman filed against the legislative assembly in 2013.In aoftensternly-worded ruling, Wright foundthat, in its delayed response to Portman's concerns about the heavy wooden door to the washroom for disabled persons, the assembly "reacted as though it was wrong of [Portman] to raise these issues and to push them to resolution."All this has caused her to suffer injury to feelings, dignity and self-respect," he concluded.Portman has declined to comment on her victory, her third human rights triumph in two months. (Another ruling, also released last week, centred partly on accessibility issues at the Ruth Inch Memorial Pool in Yellowknife.)N.W.T. legal aid's refusal to help human rights complainants 'systematically discriminating'But the N.W.T. Disabilities Council is praising Portman for bringing the issue to light, and for representing herself in what can be an intimidating process for those like Portman who can't afford a lawyer."I would hope in the future that a resolution is possible without having to have legal action as the thread to make a barrier addressed," said Denise McKee, the council's executive director. $10Kin damagesWright has ordered the assembly to pay Portman $10,000 in damages by the end of October."The legislative assembly accepts the decision of the adjudication panel and will comply with it fully," Speaker Jackson Lafferty said in a press release Tuesday."This has been a valuable learning experience and one that has resulted in significant improvements to the accessibility of our building by all members of the public. I sincerely regret that Ms. Portman suffered the indignity that she did in 2013."A representative of the assemblydeclined to take part in an interview.'No one else was saying anything' Automatic door openers were finally installed in 2014, following a number of earlier renovations, some spurred by Portman's concerns. All told, the assembly has spent $315,000 to remove barriers in the building.But as Portman argued, the remedy for that doorcame too late.Portman first raised a host of issues about accessibility with the sergeant at arms, Brian Thagard, in the summer of 2011.She had recently watched a man with two canes struggle into his seat in the publicgallery, because the gallery (at the time) had no open-faced seats."It was a crystallizing moment," said Portman during her testimony in a cramped room at a Yellowknife seniors home last May, with one of her legs propped up on an upturned garbage can."No one else was saying anything."She noticed other things at the assembly, too: People in wheelchairs were being confined to the back right side of the gallery, instead of being integrated with the rest of the gallery;There was no nearby seating for companions of people in wheelchairs;The glass doors leading to the downstairs cafeteria and washrooms looked too narrow. (She was right: the doors weren't as wide as the 2010 National Building Code called for.);And, as her follow-up email to Thagard put it, the door to the washroom for disabled people was "very heavy" and "does not come equipped with an automatic door opener.""In my experience, it's just a genuine oversight," she said of those shortcomings."I didn't get that feeling [here]."Trapped in the bathroomA month after Portman's email to Thagard, the assembly called on Pin/Taylor Architects, the Yellowknife-based company that designed the building, to look into whether the areas Portman identified met the building code of the day."The fact that the legislative assembly went back to a designer who had designed a building with barriers in place, that's nuts," said Portman. Pin/Taylor echoedPortman's email, writing that the "wooden door appears a little bit heavy to open."But using "rudimentary equipment," according to Thagard, the firm ultimately decided the pressure required to open the door was not enough to warrant a change to the door or its hardware.Two years later, on Nov. 16, 2013, Portman found out very differently.Portman, who was on crutches because of a broken foot, was attending a meeting at the assembly. On a bathroom break, she struggled to open the door.So she opted for the women's washroom.The toilet stall didn't have a grab bar, however, forcing her - after several panicked minutes duringwhich her mind raced and her legs went numb - to prop herself up using the bottom of the stall door.Portman nearly lost her balance several times and worried that, it being a Saturday, she would wind up trapped inside the washroom over the weekend.She ultimately managed to wring her way out of the washroom, but, looking back on the experience during her testimony, said it "was without dignity."What took so long?Why did it take Portman's experience to prompt the assembly to install automatic door openers?During his testimony, Tim Mercer, the clerk of the legislative assembly, cited a number of (pre-bathroom episode) reasons for the delay.He said the assembly wanted to make the change at the same time it installed a lock-down system, but that the latter initiative didn't receive support until after the October 2014 Parliament shooting in Ottawa.Mercer also said the assembly hadn'treceived anycomplaints about people not being able to access the building since itopenedin 1993.McKee of the disabilities council says her organization has not received such complaints, either.But she'squick to add: "That doesn't mean, in any way, shape or form, that individuals had not experienced difficulty."Assembly 'should not have waited'Wright, the adjudicator, didn't buy the assembly's reasoning for the delay."The [assembly] cannot use the apparent absence of previous complaints as a reason to not properly investigate concerns when raised," he wrote.Wright added that when the N.W.T.'s Human Rights Act came into effect in 2004, the assembly should have taken a proactive look at whether the building posed any barriers to people with disabilities. "[The assembly] should not have waited for acomplaint or, as it appears to have done here, determined one complaint was not sufficient to fully investigate whether the building was reasonably accessible to disabled persons," he wrote.The assembly has widened doors, added companion seating for people in wheelchairs, and madesure some seats in the public gallery remain open for those with crutches. It'salso giving its staff "human rights and duty to accommodate training" starting next month."As the 'Place of the People,' the legislative assembly should be accessible to all residents of the Northwest Territories," according to the assembly's Tuesday press release. But Portman is not as hopeful: during her testimony last spring, she said she never wants to step footinside the legislative assembly again.

A Yellowknife Woman's Torturous Bathroom Trip, and Ensuing Legal Battle 1

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Straightener for a Bender Idiom?
From the Microsoft website:When a stopgap solution becomes an undocumented feature some people rely on...However, this was only a temporary solution.From Purge, a Booklet of Individual Stop-gap Solutions:Pharmaceutically, limestone neutralizes or "sweetens" pH acidic waters. The process of adding limestone to acidic rivers is now a standard practice with environmental agencies. Yet, the source of the problem persists; combustion and consumption. We remain resigned to the stop gap solution, 'the bigger the problem, the bigger the pill'"--Artist's website, June 28, 2017Oxford English Dictionary:A temporary way of dealing with a problem or satisfying a need.transplants are only a stopgap until more sophisticated alternatives can workEtymonline:stopgap (n.)also stop-gap, 1680s, from stop (v.) gap (n.); the notion probably being of something that plugs a leak, but it may be in part from gap (n.) in a specific military sense "opening or breach in defenses by which attack may be made (1540s). Also as an adjective from 1680s.Google Books Ngram Viewer:stop-gap solution,stopgap solution,stop gap solutionIn my language we have an expression that literally translates as: "Straightener for a bender".The meaning is: When someone did something wrong and someone else is trying to fix it by adding yet another thingy, instead of doing it right directly, they're creating a "straightener for a bender".Example:You see that somebody was annoyed by the door with the automatic door closer, so they put in a door stopper. Well, that's a nice "straightener for a bender".You find in a source code that certain data has been decompressed. You wonder where does the data originate from and you find that right before the call to the decompression function they have been compressed in another function.You are reviewing recurring transactions on several bank accounts you have. And you find out that there is a loop that transfers money from 1st to 2nd, then from 2nd to 3rd and finally from 3rd to 1st bank account.Can be also used in software process, DIY projects, car repair, pretty much anywhere.Question is: Is there an expression/idiom to describe that in English?·OTHER ANSWER:In my language we have an expression that literally translates as: "Straightener for a bender".The meaning is: When someone did something wrong and someone else is trying to fix it by adding yet another thingy, instead of doing it right directly, they're creating a "straightener for a bender".Example:You see that somebody was annoyed by the door with the automatic door closer, so they put in a door stopper. Well, that's a nice "straightener for a bender".You find in a source code that certain data has been decompressed. You wonder where does the data originate from and you find that right before the call to the decompression function they have been compressed in another function.You are reviewing recurring transactions on several bank accounts you have. And you find out that there is a loop that transfers money from 1st to 2nd, then from 2nd to 3rd and finally from 3rd to 1st bank account.Can be also used in software process, DIY projects, car repair, pretty much anywhere.Question is: Is there an expression/idiom to describe that in English?
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Straightener for a Bender Idiom?
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